GREAT STORIES TOGETHER

BOFA FESTIVAL 2021 | LAUNCESTON 30 APRIL - 2 MAY | FREE ONLINE 3 - 30 MAY | HOBART 28 - 30 MAY

FILMS BY THEMES 2020 PROGRAM

WORLD STORIES

Since 1949 the Launceston Film Society (LFS) has been opening a window to the world for its film-loving members. Currently with 1,600 members it is one of the largest film societies in Australia and offers 40 new films each year from Australia and around the world to ” promote the opportunity for the viewing of films of merit, and to encourage interest in film as an art form”. LFS was the co-founder of the BOFA Film Festival in 2010 and has supported our Opening Night screening every year since then. Who better then to support BOFA in this innovative online response to the Coronavirus pandemic and, in so doing, to keep faith with the LFS members, who have been deprived of their weekly visit to view wonderful Stories of the World !

FEATURE

ADAM

ONLINE FESTIVAL
FRI 1 – SUN 17 MAY 2020

Set in a traditional Moroccan in-home bakery in Casablanca, Adam explores the bond between women that can bridge and conquer the prejudices of a conservative, male-dominated society.

DOCUMENTARY

CHINA LOVE

ONLINE FESTIVAL
FRI 1 – SUN 17 MAY 2020

The wedding business in China is big. It has an estimated turnover of $80 billion a year, with some couples paying up to $500,000 for a single album. China Love, directed by Olivia Martin McGuire, delves into the expanding business of wedding photography as a reflection of China’s ambition, societal change and desire to demonstrate wealth.

FEATURE

DELFIN

ONLINE FESTIVAL
FRI 1 – SUN 17 MAY 2020

When you live in a shanty town on the outskirts of Buenos Aires, life offers few opportunities. But Delfín (Valentino Catania) doesn’t want the mindless drudgery of becoming a delivery boy, of having to hide from rent men, or to do badly at school like his single father.

DOCUMENTARY

WAITING FOR MAMU

ONLINE FESTIVAL
FRI 1 – SUN 17 MAY 2020

In Nepal, when a parent is sentenced to prison and there is no local guardian apart from the parents, the child is imprisoned along with their mother. This cruel and archaic convention was confronted in 2005 by Nepali social worker Pushpa Basnet, who decided early on in her career that she would devote herself to the hundreds of children who suffer under this draconian law.